Effective Health Aid

Aid effectiveness, transparency and democratic ownership remain core values of AfGH, mainstreamed into our work in different areas.
Aid effectiveness, transparency and democratic ownership remain core values of AfGH, mainstreamed into our work in different areas.

All financing modalities should be based on the principles of aid effectiveness, value for money, transparency, accountability to both donors and recipients, and equitable access to services.  Aid effectiveness, transparency and democratic ownership are central components of any future development framework. Three years after the Busan High-Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness, progress has been slow and unsatisfactory; and we are still nowhere closer to the goals of development effectiveness agreed.

The first High-Level Meeting of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation

In April 2014, the international community met for the first time since The Busan Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation was established. Over 1500 development leaders and 200 civil society organisations (CSOs) participated at the first High-Level Meeting (HLM) of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation (GPEDC) in Mexico with the aim to:

  • review global progress in making development co-operation more effective;
  • agree on actions to boost progress; and,
  • anchor effective development co-operation in the post-2015 global development agenda

The meeting focused on five main areas: inclusive development; domestic resource mobilisation; South-South co-operation; middle-income countries; and improving the role of business in development.

Up to 75% of the world’s poor live in ‘middle-income’ countries. As a result, they face complex development challenges of reducing inequality while at the same time fuelling sustained economic growth. However, the two leading middle-income countries, India and China boycotted the meeting in a move that posed questions over the legitimacy of the GPEDC overall.

Civil society welcomed the commitments on inclusive development, untying aid, democratic country ownership, enhanced taxation and the use of country systems, gender equality and women’s empowerment, and most importantly, the support for CSOs as independent development actors – but these were past pledges and commitments, not new.

At the Busan Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation CSOs were recognised as full and equal participants in development for the first time ever, yet progress has been protracted.

There was some criticism over the lack of progress on mechanisms to guarantee an enabling environment for civil society. They called for a human rights-based approach, shared and implemented by all stakeholders, not just civil society.

Although the Mexico HLM communiqué reflected a human-rights based approach to development and gender equality, it lacks strong, clear commitments and targets that can bring us closer to our goals. However, it will provide input towards ongoing negotiations on the post-2015 agenda, and the International Conference on Financing for Development in July 2015.